Edge of Innovation

The Making of “Little Bear Blue”

Alistair Kemp Writer

 

Meet Intel’s very own hi-tech Paddington™. Intel is powering the technology behind the new Paddington movie – in cinemas 28th November – and to celebrate, the company has commissioned one of 50 bespoke Paddington statues that have popped up all over London this week.

Studying real-life bears helped the team get Paddington’s features just right
Studying real-life bears helped the team get Paddington’s features just right

Little Bear Blue is part of the Paddington Trail which will see the unique statues placed across the capital close to the iconic Peruvian explorer’s favourite landmarks. You won’t miss him – he’s resplendent in his trademark duffle coat adorned with a cluster of magical white lights.

Bafta and Oscar-winning visual effects house Framestore used Intel technology to bring the CGI Paddington bear to life in the upcoming movie, so appropriately enough, Little Bear Blue has taken up residence outside its HQ in Soho.

As you can see from the photos here, Little Bear Blue looks set to turn quite a few heads as we approach the festive period. The 3ft 6inch statue was built by creative agency 3D Eye and inspired by the stars which guided the famous bear from darkest Peru to London in the iconic books written by Michael Bond. The design pays homage to the concept of Paddington the ‘Explorer’ and is also influenced by Intel’s core philosophy of ‘It’s What’s Inside that Counts’.

Little Bear Blue is brought to life with over 100 carefully-placed LED lights
Little Bear Blue is brought to life with over 100 carefully-placed LED lights

3D Eye Project Manager Ben Comley explained how Little Bear Blue was born: “The process started with a miniature 12 inch version. Once the miniature was approved, we moved up to the 3’6”, full size clay sculpture of Paddington.

From this, we created a mould and from this mould we produced all 50 Bears. Once out of the mould, each Paddington was lovingly hand-finished and primed ready for the next stage. Little Bear Blue then had his 100 holes for his 100 LED lights marked and carefully drilled.

The original mould of Paddington – before he became Little Bear Blue
The original mould of Paddington – before he became Little Bear Blue
The holes for each of Little Bear Blue’s flashing lights are carefully drilled
The holes for each of Little Bear Blue’s flashing lights are carefully drilled

“The next stage in Little Bear Blue’s journey was having his five coats of Intel blue paint. This tough exterior paint covers him head to toe. After five coats of paint he had the all-important lights fitted with his specially-designed light controller with movement sensor. A final check and Little Bear Blue was born.

“The whole process of creating the statues now live across London took about five months. And the production of Little Bear Bluearound three weeks. Working directly with the producer of the Paddington film, David Heyman, and the Framestore animation team, this has been an incredibly exciting project for us.”

Paddington, released in cinemas on 28th November, features several of the trail locations, including Paddington Station, the Peruvian bear’s first port of entry into the capital and brings together an all-star cast.

The finished product – say hello to Little Bear Blue
The finished product – say hello to Little Bear Blue

Follow Intel UK on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for all the latest from #LittleBearBlue, and visit him yourself as part of the Paddington Trail, running until 30th December.

To find out more about Paddington and the film visit www.paddington.com.
PaddingtonTM and Paddington BearTM are the trademarks of Paddington & Co Ltd.

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